Tag Archives: oral care

Your Child’s First Dental Visit | Dallas Dentist

5204965366_72b96dbea3As a new parent, you are constantly wondering if you’re doing the job right. The last thing you ever want is to have something happen to your child because X, Y, or Z slipped through the proverbial cracks. One of these overlooked details is a child’s dental health. A survey commissioned by the Delta Dental Plans Association revealed that the average age children had their first dental visit was 2.6 years and 34% of children hadn’t seen the dentist at all. Oftentimes, we as parents think our child is too young or doesn’t have enough teeth to make it much of an issue. In actuality, children should start visiting the dentist any time between first tooth and their first birthday. Why, you ask? Well, an early start with a dentist will help alleviate any trepidation they may have about these visits throughout their lives. It can also be beneficial to get some basic knowledge as to how your child’s dental health should be handled at home so that there aren’t problems growing up.

So, what is the first step to getting your munchkin’s oral health in order? First, find a dentist. You can use your personal dentist or look for a pediatric dentist. A pediatric dentist is everything your dentist is, but has a couple more years of school so they are fully-equipped to focus on the specific needs of children. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind when making the appointment? Setting it after your child has a good rest under their belt is ideal; fussiness is at a minimum and they are much more willing to be cooperative.

Once you have made their first dental appointment, the next step is to get your child into the idea of going. There are lot of ways to prepare your little one for this adventure. Learning about what will happen through books and other resources is fantastic help, but it is also great to give them a bit of a preview. Take them next time you have an appointment, or take turns roleplaying what the dentist will be doing poking around in their mouths. Having a dentist poking around with sharp tools is always going to be a scary thing for a tiny human. The more preparation you do, the smoother the experience will be.

On the day of your child’s first visit, expect to have lots of opportunity to ask any questions you may have. The dentist will go over your child’s history and give you a crash course as to what you can expect in upcoming months. A thorough examination of your child’s mouth will be done so the dentist can clearly distinguish any issues that may arise due to habits like thumb sucking, poor hygienic practice or diet. And, if necessary, your dentist or hygienist may clean your child’s teeth if stains are apparent and/or apply fluoride to prevent future cavities. Making sure your little one is comfortable is your first priority so be sure to bring things that soothe them, whether it be a little snack, a favorite toy or blanket. Keeping them happy will ensure you leave that first appointment ready and able to tackle any surprises that may hinder that sweet baby smile you love so much.

To learn more about how Dr. Gary Alhadef can help you maintain your child’s oral health, please contact his Dallas, Texas dental office to schedule a consultation. Visit our website at www.dallascosmeticdental.com to learn more.

Dr. Gary Alhadef, DDS proudly serves Dallas and all surrounding areas.

Can a Great Smile Change Your Life? | Dallas Dentist

When you don’t have the perfect smile, it is tough to be in certain situations. A smile is the first thing someone notices about you. If yours is flawed, it feels like you are perceived differently by others. But it’s difficult not to think, can having a better smile change my life?

In our western culture, it is common to see kids with braces, adults whitening their teeth (the most practiced cosmetic dental procedure), veneer procedures increasing in number etc. Why is that? Your smile is one of the first things people notice about you.

Humans unconsciously judge one another within the first eight seconds of meeting. A poor smile can hold you back from so many opportunities such as:

  • Employment
  • Promotion
  • Self confidence
  • Relationships

Our society places such high regard on one’s physical appearance, that a great smile is almost mandatory. So, now the question becomes, how can I improve my smile to improve my life?

Veneers are a simple and effective way to improve your smile and a number of dental issues. Veneers are basically a custom perfect smile shell that gives you the glamorously straight, white smile you have always wanted. Patients rave that after they make the switch to veneers, they experience a confidence boost and their professional and personal lives are enhanced!

But what exactly entails having to keep veneers up? Does it take a lot of effort to keep them looking fantastic? Firstly, it all comes down to the basics. Brushing and flossing daily is not only good for your veneers, but will also help to prevent future veneers. Use a nonabrasive toothpaste containing fluoride to ensure that that it won’t scratch your veneers, leaving them prone to issues like periodontitis, which can cause your gums to recede. Because your veneers are placed right at the gum line, if your gums do happen to recede, the appearance of your veneers could be compromised.

If staining is one of your main issues, staying clear from beverages like coffee, wine and tea is a great idea to keep your new teeth pearly white. Porcelain is very resistant to staining by nature, but the cement used to affix the veneers is prone to staining over time.

Chipped teeth are generally caused by accidental incidents, but can also be caused by biting your fingernails or munching on things like hard candy or ice. While it seems like a harmless act, using your teeth to do things like this can break or dislodge your teeth, but can also do the same to your veneer. Stay away from using your teeth as a chisel. While they are always handy, being in your mouth, it isn’t good for your teeth. Similarly, if you are known to clench or grind your teeth, like while you sleep, this is also a bad habit that is really doing damage to your teeth. Talk to your dentist. They can create a night guard that will prevent your teeth from wearing down and your veneers from accidentally chipping.

So, if you would like to literally change your life and get the smile of your dreams, then contact your dentist today to see if veneers are right for you!

If you think that you may be ready for a more perfect smile, contact Dr. Gary Alhadef, DDS to schedule a consult today. Visit our website at www.dallascosmeticdental.com to learn more about veneers.

 

What’s a Water Flosser? | Oral Care

flossingDespite how often dentists remind people about the importance of flossing, most of them let it go in one ear and out the other. According to statistics, only half of American’s floss daily, and 18.5% of them don’t floss at all.

While flossing can be tedious, awkward and downright messy, it’s still a very important part of your daily oral care routine. Floss is able to reach the areas in between your teeth and gums your toothbrush isn’t able to get to. But did you know there’s an alternative option to flossing?

If you’re looking for ways to reap the benefits of flossing, but don’t want to use traditional dental floss, you can use a device called a water flosser. Water flossers are highly recommended by dentists and users.

How Water Flossers Work

A water flosser, also known as a water pick, is a dental appliance designed to be used at home as at home as an alternative to traditional dental floss. This dental appliance varies in size and features, but most water flossers include a motor pump, water reservoir and special tips.

Like pressure washers, water flossers use the same concept, in that the motor and pump cause a stream of pressurized water to flow from the water reservoir through the tips. The only difference is that water flossers are not as powerful and are meant to be used orally.

The main use of water flossers is to remove built up plaque and bacteria that brushing alone cannot take care of. Water Flossers are also less award and typically easier to use. In addition, the water helps simulate your gum tissues, which in turn results in extra health benefits.

Should I Invest in a Water Flosser?

One of the many reasons people prefer to use a water flosser over traditional dental floss is that they’re just easier to use. However, that’s not all there is to this dental appliance.

Many of those who’ve made to switch to water flossers reported having a more pleasant experience, which in turn resulted in them flossing their teeth more often than they would using traditional dental floss.

Another great reason you may want invest in a water flosser is to prevent or treat gum disease. Water flossers have been clinically proven to help remove plaque, improve gum health and even reduce gingivitis.

People with braces or others types of orthodontic appliances reap the most benefits from using a water flosser. Same goes for those that have bridges, crowns, dental implants, as well as people with medical conditions that prevent them from flossing properly, such as arthritis.

How to Use a Water Flosser

As mentioned earlier, water flossing is much more convenient compared to using traditional dental floss. Also, when using a water flosser, you won’t have to look in the mirror or keep your mouth opened wide throughout the whole process.

To begin, simply put the water flosser’s tip into your mouth, close your lips most of the way, lean over a sink and switch the power on. Then floss along your gum line and in between your teeth, while allowing the water to empty into your bathroom or kitchen sink.

When water flossers are user properly, they can be a great addition to your daily oral care routine. Remember, not only is proper oral care important to your oral health, but to your overall health as well.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding your oral health, contact Dr. Gary Alhadef, DDS at 214-368-2434 to schedule an appointment today. Or visit www.dallascosmeticdental.com for additional information regarding oral health.

Why Are My Teeth So Yellow?

187957730Have you ever looked in the mirror and wondered how your teeth got so yellow or stained? Well if you have, you’re not alone, many of us have wonder the same exact thing. Since your teeth can yellow over time, it can be easily overlooked. Fortunately, yellowing and stained teeth aren’t a sign of any serious medical conditions. As disheartening as it may seem to lose your once bright, pearly whites, you’ll be glad to know you can get it back. Before you can do that though, you must find out what’s causing the yellowing, and how you can best avoid or limit your exposer to those things.

  • Aging- As you age, the white protective coating on your teeth called enamel slowly fades away. This and the daily use of your teeth can slowly lead to revealing the natural color of dentine, which is yellow.
  • Genetics- It’s very much possible that you inherited enamel that has more of a yellowish tint rather than white.
  • Tobacco use- Tobacco products, such as chew tobacco and cigarettes are known to stain teeth, along with causing a long list of other health complications.
  • Medication- Certain types of medication, such as doxycycline and tetracycline, can darken the teeth of children that under the age eight. Other types of medications such as antihistamines, antipsychotics and drugs used for high blood pressure may also cause discoloration of your teeth.
  • Illness- A less common cause of tooth discoloration can be caused from a disease that effects enamel, or a treatment for a disease, like chemotherapy and/or radiation used to treat cancer. In this case, instead of yellow, the discoloration would be more of a brownish color.
  • Poor Oral Hygiene- When you don’t routinely brush, floss and use mouthwash to remove plaque buildup and tartar you teeth, you teeth can be come yellow or discolored.
  • Certain Drinks and Food- Coffee, tea, soda and wine are all beverages that can darken teeth. As for food, apples and potatoes, as well as a few other types of fruits and vegetables can also stain teeth.

Take Action Against Yellow Teeth

Unfortunately, unless you’ve found the fountain of youth, there’s not much you can do to reverse the effects of aging, and what you inherited genetically is also something that can’t be changed. Same goes for certain illnesses and treatments, there really isn’t much you can personally do to reverse the effects. When it comes to stains caused by food, drinks or tobacco use, it’s up to you to avoid them as much as possible.

In addition to your daily oral hygiene routine, you can try and use over the counter products, such as whitening strips, to help brighten your teeth a few shades. If you would like to learn more about them, you can ask you family dentist.

Speaking of your dentist, they can provide you with a custom teeth bleaching kit that you’re able to take home. Take home teeth bleaching kits can whiten you teeth a few shades after a few weeks or months. Most dentists also offering in-office teeth whitening procedures that can whiten your teeth up to ten shades, within one office visit.

There are many options to treat yellow teeth, ranging from whitening strips to dentists trips, so there’s no reason you shouldn’t be smiling!

If you’re sick of having yellow teeth and would like to know which treatment options you would be a good candidate for, contact Dr. Gary Alhadef DDS at 214-368-2434 to schedule a consultation today! Or visit www.dallascosmeticdental.com for information regarding teeth whitening.

Maintaining Oral Health

girl eating appleMaintaining oral health is both easy and important – failing to properly care for your mouth can lead to tooth decay, gum disease, bad breath, eventually missing teeth and potentially even systemic health issues. Much of maintaining oral health comes down to managing the bacteria that naturally occurs in your mouth through four basic procedures: brushing, flossing, rinsing with mouthwash, and having regular professional cleanings.

Bacteria in your mouth naturally form sticky, yellow film known as plaque. Over time, if that plaque is not removed, it will form a calcified deposit known as tartar, which is very difficult to remove. Brushing twice a day with toothpaste is the first step towards removing plaque and preventing tartar buildup – by brushing twice a day, you remove food the bacteria needs to survive, and physically remove plaque from the surfaces of the teeth. Failing to brush allows the bacteria within plaque to produce acids that damage tooth enamel, creating cavities and weakening teeth. Brushing at least twice a day (and ideally after each meal) can not only remove the bacteria from the teeth, but also remove the bacteria’s food source.

Flossing, like brushing, is designed to minimize plaque and tartar by physically removing both the bacteria/plaque and it’s food. Flossing between teeth helps keep the surfaces between teeth free of plaque, and protects your teeth and gums from plaque that can’t be reached by brushing alone. While you don’t need to floss as often as you brush, you should floss at least once a day.

While brushing and flossing remove plaque from your teeth, and should help prevent plaque from turning into tartar, rinsing your mouth with antibacterial/antimicrobial mouthwash can help kill any bacteria remaining in the mouth. In addition to killing bacteria on the tissue of your cheek, gums, and tongue, rinsing with mouthwash can also help dislodge any stuck food particles, again minimizing nutrients that bacteria needs to survive.

Finally, routine professional checkups and cleanings are the last step in maintaining proper oral health.  In the event that plaque does survive and mineralizes to form tartar, routine professional cleaning can help remove calcified tartar from teeth, and your dentist or hygienist can use specialized, high-speed tools to properly clean areas of your mouth that are difficult for you to clean on your own. At this time, your dentist can also check your mouth for signs of decay, gum disease, or other oral health problems, and can hopefully treat them before they cause permanent damage.

Overall, maintaining oral health comes down to building a routine of brushing, flossing, mouthwash, and regular dental visits. By following that routine, you can protect your natural teeth, avoid cavities caused by decay, and prevent the onset of periodontal disease.

For more information on oral health contact Dr. Gary Alhadef, DDS. Make an appointment by calling 469-718-0128 or visit our website atwww.dallascosmeticdental.com.

What is Tartar & How to Fight It

ThinkstockPhotos-464323669If you’ve purchased a toothbrush or mouthwash lately, you’ve probably seen the phase “tartar control”. It’s seemingly mentioned on most toothbrushes, toothpastes, and mouthwashes, but many patients don’t realize what tartar actually is, or why simple brushing, flossing, and mouthwash may not eliminate tartar entirely. To help keep your mouth healthy, it’s important to know what the goal is: what is tartar, and why is controlling tartar so important?

As you eat, bacteria and food particles combine to form a sticky yellow film known as plaque. Plaque coats your teeth – it’s difficult to clean, and it accumulates in cracks, crevices, and beneath the gum line even as you brush it off of the exposed surfaces of your teeth. The bacteria contained in plaque will damage your teeth – it creates acids that damage your tooth enamel and creates cavities. Worse still, if plaque is allowed to stay on your teeth for as little as a day, it hardens into a calcified substance known as tartar.

Just as the bacteria in plaque can cause cavities, the bacteria in tartar will damage teeth – unfortunately, as it hardens it becomes nearly impossible to remove with brushing or flossing alone. Not only can it not always be brushed off, it creates a rough surface for additional plaque to build up, and protects bacteria against your teeth, allowing them free reign to attack your tooth enamel. Typically, tartar will need to be removed with professional cleaning, which is one of the reasons dentists recommend professional cleaning every 6 months.

Because tartar is so difficult to remove, it’s often best to avoid allowing plaque to harden into tartar – by brushing twice a day, flossing every day, and using antibacterial mouthwash, you can help remove plaque before it becomes tartar. Because tartar takes 12-24 hours to harden, brushing twice a day – or after each meal – gives you multiple opportunities to catch all of the plaque before it becomes tartar. For any tartar you miss, you’ll need to rely on your routine professional cleaning to remove.

For more information on oral care contact Dr. Gary Alhadef, DDS. Make an appointment by calling 469-718-0128 or visit our website atwww.dallascosmeticdental.com.

Dental Injuries and Emergencies

cerec same day crowns dallas txDentists will encourage you to visit their office every 6 months for routine cleaning and checkups, and if everything goes well, that may be the only time you need to see your dentist. Unfortunately, sometimes life will have other ideas, and you’ll encounter dental issues that may require visits in between your routine checkups. Some dental issues are emergencies and require immediate treatment – others can wait for a scheduled appointment.

Here’s some guidelines to help you know the difference:

- If a tooth is knocked out completely, immediate care is required to save it. It’s possible that the tooth can be re-implanted if you get to the dentist within an hour or so. Rinse the tooth with water, being careful not to touch the root. Keep the tooth moist by placing it in your mouth, against your cheek, and go to the dentist immediately.
- A chipped or fractured tooth may need prompt care. If you chip or break a tooth, call your dentist – they’ll likely ask you to visit the office in the coming days for inspection. It’s difficult to know the extent of the damage without x-rays and proper checkup, so even if you feel it’s minor, be sure to call your dentist for advice.
- If you experience physical trauma that loosens a tooth, but does not fully remove it from its socket, try to remain calm. If the tooth is pushed inward or outward, GENTLY try to straighten it but do not try to force it into its socket, and call your dentist. If possible, stabilize the tooth with gauze or tissue on your way to the dentist.
- If you’re experiencing a severe toothache, brush your teeth, and then rinse with warm salt water. If you’re experiencing swelling, you may have relief with a cold compress, and for many patients, acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil) can help relieve the pain. Call your dentist for an appointment – it’s likely not an emergency, but you should have the tooth checked as soon as possible.

We can’t always avoid physical injury, but your dentist can help treat injuries as they happen. In many cases, teeth can be saved, but even in serious cases where the tooth can not be saved, your dentist can help restore your smile. Try to stay calm, call the dentist, and your dentist will provide the best possible care.

For more information on oral care contact Dr. Gary Alhadef, DDS. Make an appointment by calling 469-718-0128 or visit our website atwww.dallascosmeticdental.com.

Tips for Brushing Your Teeth

dental hygiene routineMost dentists will tell patients that the two most important things they can do at home are to brush and to floss regularly. While this advice seems simple – and it is – there are ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ ways to brush your teeth, and it’s important to understand the difference.

Start by choosing a toothbrush that is a comfortable size – if you have to strain to open your mouth to get the toothbrush in, it’s probably too big, and choose a brush with softer bristles, to avoid damaging your gums.

You should brush at least two times a day, but three is even better, and it should take about 2 minutes each time. If you spend 30 seconds on each quadrant (top right, bottom right, top left, bottom left), you’ll hit the two-minute mark.

Brush lightly, being careful not to damage the gums. Hold your brush at a 45 degree angle to your gums, and move the brush in an up and down motion, using short strokes. Avoid long, wide, side to side sweeping strokes that can cause scrapes along your gums.

Plain fluoride based toothpaste tends to be the best – whitening toothpastes, or those marketed to fight tartar, are likely to be harsh on your teeth, and may actually wear down your enamel over time.

Avoid acidic drinks that can weaken enamel – coffee, soda, orange juice, and energy drinks all will contribute to weakened enamel. Because of this, avoid brushing your teeth immediately after consuming them (in fact, you can avoid brushing immediately after a meal). If you wait a half hour after eating or drinking before brushing, your saliva will have an opportunity to bring your mouth back to it’s normal form, allowing your enamel to re-harden and make it less likely to be damaged during brushing.

Finally, take care of your toothbrush. Rinse it after each use, keep it in a clean area, and change it regularly, every 3 to 4 months. Doing so will keep the brush clean, so that you’re less likely to contaminate your mouth while trying to clean it.

For more information on oral care contact Dr. Gary Alhadef, DDS. Make an appointment by calling 469-718-0128 or visit our website at www.dallascosmeticdental.com.

Teeth Whitening

459899307Bright white teeth is something we all desire to have and if you’re tired of having yellow, stained teeth, you are not alone. What can be done about your stained and discolored teeth? Teeth whitening, of course!

Teeth whitening restores natural tooth color and bleaching whitens beyond the natural color. There are many methods available, such as brushing, bleaching strips, bleaching pen, bleaching gel, and laser bleaching. Teeth whitening has become the most requested procedure in cosmetic dentistry today. More than 100 million Americans whiten their teeth one way or another.

So if you brush, floss and visit your dentist regularly then why are your teeth still discolored? This happens because the outer layers of your teeth get stained over the years by consumption of certain foods, soda, wine and smoking.

When these outside sources of staining are left to sit on the teeth all day until your next brushing, the dentin on your teeth becomes yellowish or darkened. The best way to help your stained discolored teeth is with one of the easiest cosmetic dentistry procedures, professional teeth whitening.

Contributing factors to yellowing, stained teeth:

  • Tetracycline based antibiotics used before the age of 8 years old
  • Excessive exposure to fluoride as a child
  • Internal bleeding due to trauma
  • Discoloration due to a health condition
  • Natural aging- as time goes by enamel gets thinner and thinner and will get a yellowish hue
  • Soda
  • Wine
  • Smoking
  • Caffeine

The most popular and convenient method is in office professional treatments. Your dentist may even offer a custom tray for at home whitening. Ask Dr. Alhadef what the best plan of attack is to get your smile the whitest it can be. 

For more information on teeth whitening contact Dr. Gary Alhadef, DDS. Make an appointment by calling 469-718-0128 or visit our website at www.dallascosmeticdental.com.

Preventing Tooth Decay

cerec same day crowns dallas txWe all dread hearing the word ‘cavity’ at our dental visits. Tooth decay  is probably the most prevalent oral disease, affecting almost everyone during his or her lifetime. The good news is that it’s treatable and is essentially preventable. Tooth decay is the destruction of tooth structure and can affect both the enamel and the dentin layer of the tooth. The tooth decay process begins with dental plaque. Bacteria, which naturally live in everyone’s mouth but thrive in plaque, utilize carbohydrates from food, especially refined sugar, to produce acid. Acid, if produced frequently, will demineralize the tooth enamel structure, which is the hardest substance in the human body. From there the acid will continue to eat through the underlying dentin layer until the bacteria and their waste products reach the pulp or the nerve. Left untreated, tooth decay can lead to root infection and eventually loss of the tooth.

To prevent tooth decay:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with a fluoride-containing toothpaste. Preferably, brush after each meal and especially before going to bed.
  • Clean between your teeth daily with dental floss or interdental cleaners
  • Eat nutritious and balanced meals and limit snacks. Avoid carbohydrates such as candy, pretzels and chips, which can remain on the tooth surface. If sticky foods are eaten, brush your teeth soon afterwards.
  • Check with your dentist about use of supplemental fluoride, which strengthens your teeth.
  • Ask your dentist about dental sealants (a plastic protective coating) applied to the chewing surfaces of your back teeth (molars) to protect them from decay.
  • Drink fluoridated water. At least a pint of fluoridated water each day is needed to protect children from tooth decay.
  • Visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and oral exam.

Also mouth rinse containing fluoride can help prevent tooth decay, according to the American Dental Association. Researchers are developing new means to prevent tooth decay. One study found that a chewing gum that contains the sweetener xylitol temporarily prevents the growth of bacteria that cause tooth decay.

Finally, because you may be asymptomatic and unaware of the beginning of tooth decay, it is critical that you visit your dentist regularly for a check-up. Some cavities are hard to detect, especially those between the teeth. Sometimes, only x-rays can identify them. Your dentist will also give you a professional cleaning, which is an important part of prevention.

For more information on your oral health contact Dr. Gary Alhadef, DDS. Make an appointment by calling 469-718-0128 or visit our website at www.dallascosmeticdental.com.